Sunday, January 31, 2016

HSF #1: Procrastination


I'm quite happy I finally quit procrastinating and got working on my new Edwardian Undies. I first bought the pattern and intended on beginning it two years ago! It's about time I got around to starting them. And finishing them.

Ah, but if I had a nickel for every time I did that...


The Challenge: #1, Procrastination

Material: Cotton Batiste

Pattern: Truly Victorian TVE02

Year: About 1903

Notions: Lace, china buttons, silk ribbon.

How historically accurate is it? The materials are correct, though after starting the project, I questioned using a zig zag stitch on the insertion, as I didn't see instructions for insertion like that in my antique sewing manuals. After looking into it, as far as I can tell, the zig zag stitch was invented in the late 19th century, but was only used in industrial sewing until the late 1940's. But I had gone too far to switch the stitching... Ah well, with each project I learn more to be better next time!

Hours to complete: About a week of sewing in the afternoons.

First worn: Not yet!

Total cost: I didn't count. I had pretty much everything in my stash. Just ordered some extra insertion and ribbon after running out. 


I first started on the corset cover. The whole project was a bit of a practice sampler in lace and insertion. I used a couple different ways of attaching it. 

The ruffles were poorly thought out, on my part. I hemmed them and then decided to trim them in lace after. This meant the hems got a little stiff. Though, this could work in my favor, if that means the ruffles support a blouse better. 


The pattern said to put button holes but didn't really illustrate where, which was awkward considering the ruffles. I chose to sew on the buttons going through both the underlap ruffle and center front, and I put the button holes on the overlap, leaving the top ruffle free to be ruffly.


Instead of a button at the neckline, I decided to close it with ribbon, thread through beading. Oops! I didn't plan out the holes correctly, which fed the ends of the ribbon out the underside of the lace. No problem, though! I just added thread bars to the ends of the beading, for the ribbon to pass through.



The drawers were quite fun to make! I chose the pointy hem, which leant itself nicely to showing off the lace.




I used two widths of ribbon for trim. In the beading, I thread quarter inch ribbon, but chose inch wide ribbon to make a more impressive bow on the sides.


All in all, I totally love them! They're the first really frilly undies I've made. I'm really looking forward to finishing up the corset and then getting to start on some things that actually get seen!

16 comments:

  1. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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  2. Your Edwardian Undies are so much prettier than mine! I didn't want to bother with all the lace, but it sure does make a difference in the frilly factor ;P
    Keep up the great work

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    1. Thanks! Sometimes frilly is fun! It's takes longer, but sometimes it's worth it :)

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  3. Really pretty. There is just something about Edwardian underwear that I really love. Can't wait to see how these look under a corset :)

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    1. Rest of the corset supplies came today. Should find out soon!

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  4. Those look great! I also have a tendency to procrastinate undies, especially the labor-intensive frilly kind. Been wearing a tank top instead of a shift under my 18th century garb for a year now :p I will take this as inspiration!

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  5. The finishing looks fab. The ruffles must create the perfect "pigeon breast" Edwardian silhouette

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  6. These are lovely, the perfect Edwardian "frillies".

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  7. Having fabulous underwear makes getting dressed fun! Plus you get a great silhouette with proper support from underneath, which is a bonus from the outside. :) These are lovely!

    Best,
    Quinn

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  8. Hello, I´m interested where you buy lace? It´s big problem find this type in my country..:(

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    1. Hi! I buy pretty much all my lace online. Various websites depending on what I'm looking for and what is in stock.

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    2. Thank you, have this lace any special name? Maybe I can find it somewhere...:) M.

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    3. The laces I look for, for this kind of work, are French laces made of cotton. There are many, many names. Start by looking at farmhouse fabrics to get an idea. Here's the link: http://shop.farmhousefabrics.com/stores_app/Browse_dept_items.asp?Shopper_id=91612201641399161&Store_id=198&Page_id=17&categ_id=426&parent_ids=0&name=French+&+Spanish+Laces,+White

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